Daniel Augschöll


Photographer and editor of Ahorn Magazine who likes to share things here.

My personal work can be found at danielaugschoell.com

The Nine, Katy Grannan’s first feature length film (release date, Spring 2015) is an intimate portrait of a peripheral and charismatic community in the Central Valley that struggles to find meaning and moments of grace in a hostile environment. Katy Grannan and Hannah Hughes spent three years on South Ninth Street (locally known as The Nine). The filmmakers’ lives intertwine with those of the original subjects of the film, resulting in a tender but conflicted look at the nature of the street and of the artist’s evolving and complex relationship to their subject.

Featuring Bill Callahan’s “Drover”

Mike Mandel, Seven Never Before Published Portraits of Edward Weston (from the Mike Mandel Memorial Collection), 1974

Bill Owens, from the series Suburbia, 1973
"My dad thinks it’s a good idea to take all the leaves off the tree and rake up the yard. I think he’s crazy."

Bill Owens, from the series Suburbia, 1973

"My dad thinks it’s a good idea to take all the leaves off the tree and rake up the yard. I think he’s crazy."

Gregory Halpern, from the series California

You can see a few more images here.

(via)

Ed Ruscha, Sherwin-Williams Turpentine, from Product Still Lifes, 1961/1999. Gelatin silver print, on matte photo paper, with full margins

Ed Ruscha, Sherwin-Williams Turpentine, from Product Still Lifes, 1961/1999. Gelatin silver print, on matte photo paper, with full margins

Sean Stewart, from the series Local Color

Sean Stewart, from the series Local Color

In the last months I’ve been working on a publication entitled “FWFS”, conceived to be part of a larger project called “Far Well Fany Stix”. More information soon!

In the last months I’ve been working on a publication entitled “FWFS”, conceived to be part of a larger project called “Far Well Fany Stix”. More information soon!

Larry Sultan, Untitled Home Movie Stills, 1984-1992

"We all have our ritual snapshots. These are very precious things that constitute a personal archive. Photography allows you to carry a trace of the past with you.

With movie stills, the event has been distilled into myth. I would imagine that’s why it looks like everybody else’s past. While my photographs are specific and I have that very personal relationship to them, the images also possess the quality of cultural myth: footage of a bear chasing somebody through Yosemite, jumping through a hula-hoop, holding a child at a waterfall, measuring each other next to a ‘55 Buick. We all performed rituals. These images constitute an icon of a family.

By taking stills, I’ve transformed the movies themselves. If it was just the movies, their general effect would be that kind of edited, distilled recreation of cultural history. By isolating stills, I can make my own incision. The off-moments, that look of worry on someone’s face, in the middle of all this…

The interesting thing is that my images, the stills, are both highly fabricated and mediated. But the fact that they have this filmic quality or this sense of family archive, makes them seem very personal and very real and, hopefully, they are able to do exactly what they did to you, which is to make you think about your own past.”

Larry Sultan: Excerpts from an interview with Catherine Liu for BOMB Magazine, Spring 1990

Darin Mickey

1. Robert Adams, Colorado Springs, 1968

2. Piergiorgio Branzi, Bar Adriatico, 1953

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995

Justin James Reed, from the series In Heaven

Justin James Reed, from the series In Heaven